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  5. The final three events of the 2022 WSOP Europe festival saw three winners from different countries, an all-Ukrainian heads-up match and a close call for a former Main Event champion. With events in Pot Limit Omaha and No Limit Hold’em, from bounty to turbo action, it was non-stop in Rozvadov.   Van Ruiten Wins Backed Bracelet   Dutchman Yair van Ruiten won his first-ever WSOP bracelet after a rollercoaster ride in Event #13 saw him claim victory in the €1,650-entry PLO/NLHE mixed game event. With a total of 251 entries and a prizepool of €357,675, the top prize of €85,405 was won after a gruelling 15-hour day at the felt.   With nine players reaching the final table, it was the Ukrainian player Oleksii Kovalchuk, who won €6,622 when he lost to the eventual winner whose pocket aces pre-flop were enough to help him to a valuable pot, with van Ruiten’s pocket queens unable to catch up. It wasn’t long before Manig Loeser of Germany joined him on the rail, cashing for €8,270 when his pocket aces in the hole lost out to van Ruiten’s two pair on the flop.   The Dutchman was running away with it, although he took an elimination off when Ioannis Konstas took care of French player Steve Galletti, who left in seventh place for €10,598. Next to go was the other Dutch player at the table, as Rutger Johan Bosch went out with a result worth €13,297 when his [poker card="Kd"][poker card="Js"] lost to Christian Pocklow’s [poker card="Qs"][poker card="Qh"]. The board of [poker card="Ad"][poker card="Ts"][poker card="6c"][poker card="8d"][poker card="8s"] sent the Dutchman home, with the German player Pocklow vaulting up the leaderboard.   Italian player Marco Di Persio missed out on the top four after he lost in PLO to Ran Ilani, cashing for €18,756. Despite taking out his opponent, however, Israeli Ilani was the next to bust, unable to make the podium places when he busted in fourth for €25,872. With the blinds going up, the bust-outs came quickly, and before three-handed poker had really got into a rhythm, the game was heads-up.   Polkow lost out in third place for €36,531 and again, it was in Pot Limit Omaha as his short stack disappeared, claimed by Greek player Konstas, which gave him 3.8 million chips. That put him within range of van Ruiten but was to prove pointless as a cooler of a final hand played out almost immediately in PLO too.   After chunky bets on the flop and turn of a board showing [poker card="9h"][poker card="4c"][poker card="4d"][poker card="2d"][poker card="Jh"], the river was where the real drama kicked off. After a bet from Konstas with [poker card="As"][poker card="Qs"][poker card="Th"][poker card="4s"] for flopped trips, van Ruiten shoved with the flopped full house of [poker card="Ac"][poker card="Tc"][poker card="9c"][poker card="9s"]. Konstas couldn’t find the fold and when he called, guaranteed himself only the runner-up prize of €52,772, with van Ruiten, who was persuaded by his backer to play the event, took home the top prize of €85,405 and his first-ever WSOP gold bracelet.   WSOP Europe 2022 Event #13 €1,650 PLO/NLHE Final Table Results: Place Player Country Prize 1st Yair van Ruiten Netherlands €85,405 2nd Ioannis Konstas Greece €52,772 3rd Christian Polkow Germany €36,531 4th Ran Ilani Israel €25,872 5th Marco Di Persio Italy €18,756 6th Rutger Johan Bosch Netherlands €13,297 7th Steve Galletti France €10,598 8th Manig Loeser Germany €8,270 9th Oleksii Kovalchuk Ukraine €6,622   Maekelberg Wins Only Belgian Bracelet of 2022 WSOPE Series   The only Belgian player to win a World Series bracelet this series was Karim Maekelberg, who conquered a crazy No Limit Hold’em Bounty Hunter Event #14 for a top prize of €62,111. The event, which had 436 entries, saw another entertaining nine players reach the final table again, this time including the WSOP Main Event winner of 2019, Hossein Ensan.   The first player to exit the final table was Balakrishna Patur. The American, one of two Stateside players of the final nine, left when his [poker card="9h"][poker card="8d"] lost out to Rolando Camardese’s [poker card="Qh"][poker card="4d"] as the board came out in the Dutch player’s favor. After a flop of [poker card="Td"][poker card="6d"][poker card="2s"] gave the all-in player a gutshot, the turn of [poker card="Kc"] and river [poker card="Js"] ended the event for the American, as Patur cashed for €4,415.   A double elimination took place next as Antonino Calabro left in seventh place for €7,393, with the world champion of three years ago Ensan leaving for €5,653 in eighth. Both men had pocket pairs pre-flop, with Ensan’s [poker card="3c"][poker card="3d"] and Calabro’s [poker card="Qh"][poker card="Qd"] losing to Teho Schmitt’s [poker card="Ac"][poker card="Qs"] when ace on the flop doomed both the German’s rivals including his famous countryman.   Well-known live circuit regular Aaron Duczak was the next to go, losing to Brian Cornell to cash for €9,873 in sixth place, before Dinesh Alt joined him on the rail. Camardese won again to bust a rival, as Alt’s [poker card="As"][poker card="8s"] couldn’t overtake the Dutchman’s [poker card="Th"][poker card="Ts"], sending him home for €13,458, the first five-figure score, in fifth place.   Having won that hand, Camardese’s intentions of using it as a platform for glory floundered at the first opportunity. His [poker card="Ad"][poker card="Jc"] lost to the eventual champion’s [poker card="Kd"][poker card="3s"] after the board of [poker card="6h"][poker card="3h"][poker card="2c"][poker card="Qd"][poker card="5s"] paired Maekelberg’s three and reduced the field to the same number.   Brian Cornell had enjoyed a fine run, but again showed that Americans could only get close to gold this series without claiming any of it, denied in third place for €26,542. His short stack went into the middle behind [poker card="Jh"][poker card="8s"] but that was well behind Maekelberg’s [poker card="Td"][poker card="Tc"] and stayed that way through the board of [poker card="9c"][poker card="8h"][poker card="6d"][poker card="Ac"][poker card="Th"], with all the chips going in on the flop.   Heads-up, that pot gave Maekelberg a big lead, but he couldn’t hold onto it for long. Theo Schmitt took the lead from him, only for it to swing back the Dutch player’s way. Schmitt committed all of his chips with [poker card="7s"][poker card="7h"], but couldn’t hold as Maekelberg won a flip to take the title with [poker card="Kc"][poker card="Jc"]. The board of [poker card="Kh"][poker card="6s"][poker card="3c"] had landed by the time the money went in, with the [poker card="Th"] turn and [poker card="Tc"] river condemning Schmitt to second place and a consolation prize of €38,375, with Maekelberg the proud owner of a gold bracelet and his first WSOP bracelet.   WSOP Europe 2022 Event #14 €1,100 NLHE Bounty Hunter Final Table Results: Place Player Country Prize 1st Karim Maekelberg Belgium €62,111 2nd Theo Schmitt Germany €38,375 3rd Brian Cornell U.S.A. €26,542 4th Rolando Camardese Netherlands €18,715 5th Dinesh Alt Austria €13,458 6th Aaron Duczak Canada €9,873 7th Antonino Calabro Italy €7,393 8th Hossein Ensan Germany €5,653 9th Balakrishna Patur U.S.A. €4,415   Lyubovetskiy Claims Final Bracelet and Double Joy for Ukraine   Ukrainian player Andriy Lyubovetskiy won his second WSOP bracelet in extraordinary fashion as he took gold against his countryman Oleksii Kovalchuk in Rozvadov. Bringing the curtain down on the tournament and the festival, the 15th WSOP bracelet of the series went East after 12 hours at the felt on the final day.   Italian player Fabio Peluso missed out in ninth place, earning €3,482 but falling short of the fairly incredible possibility of winning both the first and last bracelet events of the series. Peluso was all-in pre-flop with [poker card="6d"][poker card="6s"] but was called by MEdh Caoui Roqai with [poker card="Qs"][poker card="Qc"]. The Moroccan’s better pair had no trouble holding through the [poker card="Th"][poker card="3h"][poker card="2s"][poker card="Kc"][poker card="Kh"] board.   Next to bust was the German player Thore Kunze. He was all-in with [poker card="Ac"][poker card="Qd"] pre-flop, but although he started his final hand better than Johan Guilbert’s [poker card="Td"][poker card="9d"], the board of [poker card="Kc"][poker card="5d"][poker card="3d"][poker card="Th"][poker card="5c"] gave the French player a pair of tens on the turn.   A few minutes later, home country anti-hero Martin Kabrhel left the competition, dooming the hosts to zero winners from 15 bracelets. Kabrhel was short stacked when shoved with [poker card="Qd"][poker card="4s"] but lost easily to the crushing overpair of Lyubovetskiy with [poker card="Ac"][poker card="Ah"]. The nine-high board sent Kabrhel home in seventh place for €5,517.   Guilbert may have won that hand, but soon after, he had joined the Czech pro on the rail. Shoving from the cutoff with [poker card="3d"][poker card="3s"], Roqai called with [poker card="Jd"][poker card="Jc"] and survived the board of [poker card="Qc"][poker card="7c"][poker card="4h"][poker card="2c"][poker card="7d"] still ahead to reduce the field to five and send Guilbert home.   After German pro Ben Stiefel busted in fifth for €9,783, a second Italian went close in fourth place for €13,565. Edolo Ghirelli had a short stack and lost to Lyubovetskiy’s rivered nut flush, and a few minutes later, Roqai busted in third place for €19,304. He called with [poker card="Kd"][poker card="Qs"] and was ahead of his rival Kovalchuk who had shoved with [poker card="Qc"][poker card="Td"]. But the board of [poker card="7c"][poker card="5c"][poker card="3c"][poker card="9s"][poker card="4c"] gave Kovalchuk a four-flush on the river to send him into an all-Ukrainian heads-up match.   In the end, Lyubovetskiy won with a premium hand against another big one, with Kovalchuk committing his stack with [poker card="Ad"][poker card="Ts"]. Lyubovetskiy held [poker card="Ah"][poker card="Qs"] and held through the [poker card="Ac"][poker card="Qd"][poker card="5d"][poker card="2d"][poker card="Jc"] board, winning his second WSOP bracelet and the final top prize of €45,606.   WSOP Europe 2022 Event #15 €1,000 NLHE Turbo Freezeout Final Table Results: Place Player Country Prize 1st Andriy Lyubovetskiy Ukraine € 45,606 2nd Oleksii Kovalchuk Ukraine € 28,178 3rd Medhi Chaoui Roqai Morocco € 19,304 4th Edolo Ghirelli Italy € 13,565 5th Benjamin Stiefel Germany € 9,783 6th Johan Guilbert France € 7,246 7th Martin Kabrhel Czech Republic € 5,517 8th Thore Kunze Germany € 4,320 9th Fabio Peluso Italy € 3,482     The 2022 World Series of Poker Europe’s latest series saw fifteen different winners from 12 different countries, with only Ukraine (2) and Germany (3) enjoying multiple winners.   World Series of Poker Europe 2022 Event Winners # Buy-In Event Details Entries Winner Country Top Prize 1 €350 NLHE Opener 2,454 Fabio Peluso Italy €95,670 2 €550 Pot-Limit Omaha 8-Max 566 Helmut Phung Germany €55,132 3 €1,350 NLHE Mini Main Event 1,431 Ilija Savevski Macedonia €245,319 4 €2,000 Pot-Limit Omaha 221 Anson Tsang Hong Kong €95,461 5 €550 NLHE Colossus 2,982 Lubos Laska Slovakia €170,568 6 €5,000 Pot-Limit Omaha 223 Roman Verenko Ukraine €247,288 7 €1,650 NLHE 6-Max 413 Max Kruse Germany €134,152 8 €25,000 NLHE Platinum High Roller 67 Paul Phua Malaysia €482,433 9 €2,200 Short Deck 91 Emil Bise Switzerland €49,521 10 €2,000 8-Game Mix 102 Thomer Pidun Germany €49,245 11 €50,000 NLHE Diamond High Roller 45 Orpen Kisacikoglu Turkey €748,106 12 €10,350 Main Event 763 Omar Eljach Sweden €1,380,129 13 €1,650 PLO/NLH Mixed 251 Yair Van Ruiten Netherlands €85,405 14 €1,100 NLHE Bounty Hunter 436 Karim Maekelberg Belgium €62,111 15 €1,000 NLHE Turbo Freezeout 211 Andrey Lyubovetskiy Ukraine €45,606
  6. The 2022 World Series of Poker Europe’s showstopper has been won by Swedish player Omar Eljach after an epic heads-up match against Jonathan Pastore. Winning his first-ever WSOP gold bracelet, Eljach also took home the €1.3 million top prize and a ticket into the 2023 WSOP Tournament of Champions in Las Vegas.   Boatman’s Battle Over Early   The eight players who began the final all knew that with over a million dollars the difference between a min-cash and the top prize on offer, there was a lot on the line. The first player to leave was the overnight chip leader from earlier in the event, as French player Alexandre Reard bowed out for a cash worth €138,702.   Reard was all-in pre-flop, four-bet shoving with [poker card="Qh"][poker card="Qc"] but running into Omar Eljach’s [poker card="As"][poker card="Ah"]. The flop of [poker card="Ad"][poker card="Ks"][poker card="4s"] set the tone for the hand, leaving Reard stranded to anything other than a runner-runner miracle, and after the [poker card="3s"] turn landed, it was all over, Reard standing as the ineffectual [poker card="7s"] hit the river.   It was the British poker legend and co-founder of The Hendon Mob, Barny Boatman, who made it to seventh place but no further. The double WSOP bracelet winner cashed for €180,867 in agonising fashion, too. Raising it up pre-flop with [poker card="Ah"][poker card="Ac"], Boatman was called by Shaun Deeb, whose [poker card="Qc"][poker card="Jd"] hit the flop of [poker card="Qd"][poker card="Js"][poker card="4s"] so hard he almost bounced off the canvas. The turn of [poker card="5h"] and river of [poker card="7s"] changed nothing and the British poker hero exited outside the top six.   It was the Austrian player Armin Rezaei who busted in sixth place, cashing for just shy of a quarter of a million euros when he lost to the eventual bracelet winner. All-in with [poker card="Js"][poker card="Jd"], Rezaei was flipping against Eljach’s [poker card="Ad"][poker card="Qh"] for his tournament life. The flop of [poker card="Ac"][poker card="9d"][poker card="7h"] immediately set Rezaei behind, and after the [poker card="3d"] turn and [poker card="Ks"] river, the Austrian was on the rail.   Deeb Defeated Late Again   With five players left, the race was very much on for the title. The latest player to bust was Paul Covaciu, as the Romanian exited for a score of €321,838 four places short of becoming the WSOP Europe champion. Calling a raise with [poker card="Kh"][poker card="Qs"], Covaciu was tossing a coin pre-flop, with Lithuanian Vladas Tamasauskas holding [poker card="Js"][poker card="Jh"]. The flop of [poker card="8d"][poker card="6h"][poker card="4c"] was no help to Covaciu’s hand, but he moved all-in just the same, receiving a swift call from his Lithuanian opponent, and after the board double-paired with a [poker card="4d"] tur and [poker card="8c"] river, the Romanian found himself on the rail.   Covaciu’s conqueror Tamasauskas was the next to leave in spite of winning that hand. As Shaun Deeb took over the table, Tamasauskas found himself heading for the door, as he lost out in a big pot against Jonathan Pastore. The French player shoved with [poker card="8d"][poker card="8h"] pre-flop but although he started out behind his caller Tamasauskas with [poker card="9d"][poker card="9s"]. On the flop, Pastore vaulted into the lead, with [poker card="Qs"][poker card="Td"][poker card="8s"] setting the Lithuanian behind, albeit with a straight draw too. The [poker card="Qh"] turn immediately relegated that straight draw to irrelevance, before a [poker card="2h"] on 5th street ended the hand, sending play three-handed.   Shaun Deeb had controlled huge periods of the final table, but he was the man to bust in third place. Having worked his way into a big lead where his stack was as much as both of his opponents combined, it all went wrong for the American after a series of pots going against him. Calling off his stack with [poker card="Ah"][poker card="Jd"], he started his final hand well ahead of Eljach after the Swede shoved pre-flop from the small blind with [poker card="Qc"][poker card="3c"]. That all changed on the [poker card="7h"][poker card="4d"][poker card="3s"] flop, however, and a [poker card="7d"] turn and [poker card="2c"] river ended affairs in the Frenchman’s favor.   It was an epic heads-up where both men had the chip lead on several occasions, but eventually, Eljach took the lead and found a premium hand at exactly the right time. Pastore shoved pre-flop with [poker card="Ac"][poker card="8d"] and Eljach was more than happy to call with [poker card="Qs"][poker card="Qd"], riding out the board of [poker card="8h"][poker card="7s"][poker card="2s"][poker card="Js"][poker card="Jc"] to become the WSOP Europe Main Event champion, following in the footsteps of poker legends such as Phil Hellmuth, Adrian Mateos and John Juanda.   WSOP Europe 2022 $10,300 Main Event Final Table Results: Place Player Country Prize 1st Omar Eljach Sweden €1,380,129 2nd Jonathan Pastore France €852,949 3rd Shaun Deeb U.S.A. €607,531 4th Vladas Tamasauskas Lithuania €438,978 5th Paul Covaciu Romania €321,838 6th Armin Rezaei Austria €239,466 7th Barny Boatman United Kingdom €180,867 8th Alexandre Reard France €138,702    
  7. Two more events ended in Rozvadov as British-based Turkish player Orpen Kisacikoglu and German professional Thomer Pidun both won a WSOP gold bracelet for the first time. With seven players making it to the final table of each event, two more first-time winners celebrated victory in King’s Casino, the largest cardroom outside Las Vegas, Nevada.   Turkish Kisacikoglu Crowned in King’s   An exciting end to the €50,000-entry Diamond High Roller WSOP Europe Event #11 saw Orpen Kisacikoglu crowned the champion as he beat Sam Grafton heads-up to the first gold bracelet of his career. With seven kicking off the final table, the Canadian player Daniel Dvoress was the first player to bust as he fell at the hands of the eventual winner. Dvoress called off his stack with [poker card="Ah"][poker card="5c"] only to learn he was well behind Kisacikoglu’s [poker card="Ad"][poker card="6c"]. The Canadian had hopes of at least a chop, but the board of [poker card="Js"][poker card="8c"][poker card="3c"][poker card="7s"][poker card="2c"] had other ideas and he busted in seventh place for €92,787.   It was the German player Daniel-Gai Pidun who left next as he failed to emulate his brother’s triumph in Event #10 (more on that later). Calling a raise pre-flop with [poker card="Jd"][poker card="Td"], the flop of [poker card="Kd"][poker card="Jh"][poker card="Js"] looked a great one for Pidun, but Timothy Adams held the even better [poker card="Qc"][poker card="Jc"]. After the [poker card="2s"] turn and [poker card="4s"] river, Pidun was on the rail with €119,492.   Adams may have come into the final day as the chip leader and started strongly with an elimination, but his own demise was next, busting in fifth as he did for €159,413. After an extended period of play, Kisacikoglu’s shove with [poker card="Kd"][poker card="8c"] was taken up on by Adams with the small pocket pair, but his [poker card="5d"][poker card="5c"] couldn’t survive the [poker card="Ah"][poker card="Th"][poker card="6d"]Ad][poker card="Kh"] board and he fell by the wayside.   Deeb Goes Close but Falls Late   With four players remaining, Nick Petrangelo became the first of two U.S. players to miss out on the heads-up. All-in with [poker card="Ad"][poker card="7c"], he was up against Shaun Deeb’s [poker card="7d"][poker card="5d"] as one short-stacked American hoped to double through the other with the dominating hand. That didn’t transpire, however, as the flop of [poker card="5h"][poker card="4h"][poker card="3s"] put Deeb in front and the [poker card="8c"] turn and [poker card="8h"] river confirmed Petrangelo’s exit from the event.   Despite winning that hand, Deeb was still short, and though he survived a little longer following that elimination of his compatriot, it was a stay of execution. Deeb’s call for his tournament life with [poker card="Js"][poker card="Jc"] was incorrect after Kisacikoglu’s four-bet shove with [poker card="Kd"][poker card="Kc"]. With a board of [poker card="As"][poker card="4c"][poker card="2s"][poker card="7d"][poker card="9d"] condemning Deeb to his second final table exit in WSOPE high rollers this year, this time for €313,919, the stage was set for a heads-up battle for the bracelet between two men who had never won one before.   Kisacikoglu had the chip lead with 35,400,000 chips, with Britain’s Sam Grafton some way on 9,725,000. Grafton had rallied a little to 11 million chips by the time the final hand played out, but faced a domination situation when his opponent Kisacikoglu shoved with [poker card="Kh"][poker card="Qd"] and Grafton called with [poker card="Kd"][poker card="Jh"]. The flop of [poker card="Jd"][poker card="8d"][poker card="7h"] flipped the script, putting Grafton into the lead, but the [poker card="9h"] turn was followed by a [poker card="Td"] on the river to give Kisacikoglu a runner-runner straight and the title. Grafton had been denied that crucial double-up and left in second place for €462,363, but for Kisacikoglu it was a first-ever WSOP bracelet and he treasured the moment with friends on the rail.   WSOP Europe 2022 Event #11 €50,000 Diamond High Roller Final Table Results: Place Player Country Prize 1st Orpen Kisacikoglu Turkey €748,106 2nd Sam Grafton United Kingdom €462,363 3rd Shaun Deeb U.S.A. €313,919 4th Nick Petrangelo U.S.A. €220,045 5th Timothy Adams Canada €159,413 6th Daniel-Gai Pidun Germany €119,492 7th Daniel Dvoress Canada €92,787   Chainsaw Runs Out of Gas in Event #10   Allen ‘Chainsaw’ Kessler is famous across the world for his unique personality, but although it is fair to call him a World Series legend, he has never won a WSOP gold bracelet. With seven players making the final table, ‘Chainsaw’ crashed out for €6,612 when his [poker card="Qc"][poker card="Qd"] was crushed by the even stronger [poker card="Ks"][poker card="Kd"] of French player Julien Sitbon both pre-flop and post-flop.   Next to go was Nacho Barbero, who busted in sixth place for €8,516. Barbero was also a victim of Sitbon in a hand of Razz where he could never catch up on the high-flying French player. The event needed someone else to break from cover and push for victory and in Oleksii Kovalchuk, it found it, the Ukrainian opening the tournament up when his [poker card="Tc"][poker card="Ts"] were too good for Italian Dario Alioto’s [poker card="Ac"][poker card="2d"] in Limit Hold’em as no ace came to save the short-stacked player, who cashed for €11,266 in fifth place.   Despite those two early eliminations, Sitbon was unable to use them as a springboard for very long. All-in with [poker card="Kh"][poker card="7d"] in No Limit Hold’em against Thomer Pidun’s [poker card="Kc"][poker card="4c"], the board of [poker card="Tc"][poker card="4h"][poker card="2s"][poker card="8d"][poker card="4d"] decimated Sitbons stack and raised Pidun’s chances of an outright win. Sitbon, slain, went home with €15,299 but no gold.   Three-handed, Kovalchuk (2.8 million) had the lead with both Pidun (1.3m) and Philipp Krieger (900k) trailing him by some way. The gap between the eventual top two and Krieger widened considerably before the German got his final chips into the middle in Raz, losing to Pidun, who sneaked into a marginal lead as Krieger cashed for €21,311.   The final duel saw both men take the lead on separate occasions, but eventually, Pidun led ahead of one final hand of Limit Hold’em. Kovalchuk was all-in on a flop of [poker card="Kd"][poker card="7c"][poker card="5c"] with [poker card="9s"][poker card="9c"], some way ahead of Pidun with [poker card="Jc"][poker card="6c"], but had a flush draw and three jacks to aim for and seal a bracelet win he had dreamed of for many years. A [poker card="6h"] on the turn was not what he needed but the [poker card="Ac"] on the river definitely was and with that, his flush saw him win the €49,245 top prize and his maiden gold WSOP bracelet, leaving Kovalchuk to collect €30,430.   Speaking afterwards to WSOP.com, Pidun said that since playing the same event some years ago, repeating the process helped.   “The more experience you gain the calmer you are,” he said. “I [came] in today with low expectations and I’m delighted with the victory. First I will go to the spa to relax to aid my stomach, then maybe a little drink later!”   After feeling some tension during the final table, there’s no doubt that all those butterflies have gone away now for German Thomer Pidun, 2022 WSOP Europe bracelet winner.   WSOP Europe 2022 Event #10 €2,000 8-Game Mix Final Table Results: Place Player Country Prize 1st Thomer Pidun Germany €49,245 2nd Oleksii Kovalchuk Ukraine €30,430 3rd Philipp Krieger Germany €21,311 4th Julien Sitbon France €15,299 5th Dario Alioto Italy €11,266 6th Nacho Barbero Argentina €8,516 7th Allen Kessler U.S.A. €6,612
  8. I got fucked.... Royally...

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  9. The latest three World Series of Poker Europe bracelet events crowned winners from three different countries as German international soccer star Max Kruse, Malaysian businessman and super high roller regular Paul Phua were joined by Swiss mixed game star Emil Bise in the winner’s circle.   Kruse Scores First Bracelet Victory   German soccer star Max Kruse proved that his skills extend far beyond the boundaries of some of the world’s biggest soccer stadiums. Those skills very much translate around the world on the poker felt too, as he proved in winning Event #7, the €1,650 buy-in No Limit Hold’em Six-Max event.   Making King’s Casino his own, the 34-year-old Wolfsburg forward got the better of a talented and experienced final table, proving that once he hangs up his football boots, he is sure to be a force at the felt. Starting with six players, the final table kicked off with an elimination just before the final day, as Jose Ignacio Barbero left in sixth place for €20,236. Barbero was all-in with [poker card="Kd"][poker card="4d"] on a board of [poker card="Ad"][poker card="7s"][poker card="4h"][poker card="2d"][poker card="Jh"] with just fourth pair. Dorian Melchers had flopped top pair with [poker card="Ah"][poker card="Qs"] and built his stack to 6.1 million.   Next to go, and the first to lose their stack on the final day, was the second German player at the final table, Orhan Sen. Cashing for €27,482, Sen’s [poker card="Ah"][poker card="7c"] was no good when committed against the Frenchman Melchers’ [poker card="As"][poker card="8c"], the board of [poker card="9s"][poker card="4c"][poker card="3h"][poker card="6c"][poker card="9c"] providing no help to the German player as Melchers started where he left off, busting one of his opponents.   Kruse Control   The next player who lost his seat was the Israeli player Leonid Yanovski, who departed in fourth place for €38,010. Yanovski’s stack was committed with [poker card="As"][poker card="8c"], but when Max Kruse’s [poker card="Ad"][poker card="3s"] hit on the [poker card="Qs"][poker card="4s"][poker card="3c"] flop, the German moved ahead. After the [poker card="4h"] turn and [poker card="9s"] river, Kruse was the new chip leader at the perfect time, and Yanovski was on the rail.   Three-handed, a huge all-in and call saw Colombian player Farid Jattin eliminated after his shove with [poker card="Ks"][poker card="9s"] ran into Melchers’ [poker card="Ac"][poker card="8s"], with the board of [poker card="Ah"][poker card="Ad"][poker card="6h"][poker card="Qh"][poker card="4s"] sending the South American player home in third place for €63,874, giving Melchers a 2:1 chip lead.   Heads-up saw Kruse turn the tables on his opponent as he ground his way into a lead before the final decisive hand saw almost all of the chips at risk in a coinflip. Melchers shoved for a massive stack of over 7 million with [poker card="Ad"][poker card="Qh"] and Kruse made the call with [poker card="2h"][poker card="2s"]. The flop of [poker card="Th"][poker card="6c"][poker card="5s"] kept Kruse ahead, but the [poker card="Qs"] turn changed all that, putting Melchers one card away from having 90% of the chips in play. The river, however, stunned everyone in the room, as the [poker card="2d"] landed to leave Kruse cheering his first-ever WSOP bracelet victory. If he continues to play after his soccer career, it’s sure not to be his last.   2022 WSOP Europe €1,650 Event #7 Final Table Results: Place Player Country Prize 1st Max Kruse Germany €134,152 2nd Dorian Melchers France €87,059 3rd Farid Jattin Colombia €63,874 4th Leonid Yanovski Israel €38,010 5th Orhan Sen Germany €27,482 6th Nacho Barbero Argentina €20,236   The World Champion is the First to Leave   There were 67 total entries in the €25,000 Platinum High Roller Event #8, and with nine players reaching the final table of the event, it was the reigning 2022 WSOP Main Event world champion Espen Jørstad who left the party first for €45,242. The Norwegian professional, who won two WSOP bracelets in the summer in Vegas, was all-in with [poker card="Kd"][poker card="Kh"] but started the hand well behind Ben Heath’s [poker card="Ad"][poker card="Ac"]. The board of [poker card="Td"][poker card="9h"][poker card="3s"][poker card="6h"][poker card="2d"] saw Heath build a big stack of 15 million chips at Jørstad’s expense.   Eelis Parssinen was the man who busted in eighth place, cashing for €53,129. The Finnish pro was at risk for his tournament life, committing his stack with [poker card="As"][poker card="5d"] and up against Phua’s [poker card="Kd"][poker card="Tc"]. The flop of [poker card="Kc"][poker card="7d"][poker card="2s"] put Phua in the lead, and through the [poker card="8h"] turn and [poker card="4d"] river, Parssinen was sent to the rail.   Hong Kong’s Wayne Heung busted in seventh place for €64,835 when he ran into a monster in the form of Shaun Deeb. It was the five-time WSOP winner Deeb who shoved pre-flop with [poker card="Ac"][poker card="Qh"], and Heung’s call with [poker card="Kc"][poker card="8d"] saw him needing help from the board to survive. He got none of that on the [poker card="Ah"][poker card="9h"][poker card="9s"] flop, and after the [poker card="9d"] turn and [poker card="5d"] river dropped, so too did Heung.   With six left, the variance levels were through the roof. Stacks were shallow and a double-up into the chip lead for Daniel Negreanu with pocket queens led to the beaten Ben Heath’s demise shortly after. Heath’s [poker card="Ah"][poker card="Qh"] started the hand ahead of Phua’s [poker card="As"][poker card="9h"], but a board of [poker card="7h"][poker card="6c"][poker card="2d"][poker card="9s"][poker card="Ks"] quite literally turned Phua’s hand into the winner and Heath claimed €82,104 as he exited.   Kid Poker Crushed by Yet Another Bad Beat   Five players remained, and after French player Julien Martini lost out in fifth for €107,752, that was four, including WSOP Player of the Year rivals of old, Daniel Negreanu and Shaun Deeb. It was Negreanu who busted next for €146,370, but in extremely unfortunate circumstances as his perceived run of bad luck at final tables persisted. All-in with [poker card="5h"][poker card="5d"], he was in great shape when Phua called with [poker card="4s"][poker card="4c"]. But the flop of [poker card="Jh"][poker card="4h"][poker card="2c"] set him behind and the [poker card="2h"] and [poker card="As"] turn and river sent him home, wishing everyone “GG”.   Deeb lasted only a short time longer. All-in with [poker card="As"][poker card="3s"], he was behind Phua’s [poker card="7s"][poker card="7d"] pre-flop and even more so post-flop as the dealer spread [poker card="7h"][poker card="6s"][poker card="5h"]. The [poker card="Qc"] turn didn’t help Deeb and the American was out after the [poker card="2s"] fell on the river, claiming €205,566 in third.   Heads-up, Phua had an almost 4:1 chip lead and made use of it very soon afterwards, despite an initial flurry of pots for Gab Yong Kim. Phua was all-in with the superior [poker card="Ac"][poker card="3h"] against Kim’s [poker card="Kc"][poker card="9c"] and after the board of [poker card="8c"][poker card="7c"][poker card="7d"][poker card="5d"][poker card="Ah"] rivered him a pair of aces, held aloft the bracelet he’d coveted so badly.   Watch the WSOP Europe 2022 Event #8 final table play out in all its glory right here:   https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=F9emntA924w   2022 WSOP Europe €25,000 High Roller Event #8 Final Table Results: Place Winner Country Prize 1st Paul Phua Malaysia €482,433 2nd Gab Yong Kim South Korea €298,163 3rd Shaun Deeb U.S.A. €205,566 4th Daniel Negreanu Canada €146,370 5th Julien Martini France €107,752 6th Ben Heath United Kingdom €82,104 7th Wayne Heung Hong Kong €64,835 8th Eelis Parssinen Finland €53,129 9th Espen Jorstad Norway €45,242   Bise Beats Ramos and Company to Gold in Event #9   In an entertaining Event #9, the €2,200 Short Deck event saw Brazilian Felipe Ramos come close to breaking his bracelet duck in third place. In the end, the Swiss player Emil Bise sealed a maiden bracelet win in Rozvadov.   Just seven players reached the final table of an event with 91 players and a top prize of €49,521, and the first of them to leave was Israel’s Tom Orpaz for €6,570. Orpaz was all-in with [poker card="As"][poker card="7h"] but fell to Simeon Tsonev’s [poker card="Kc"][poker card="Kh"] who turned the nut straight and held with ease to reduce the field to a half-dozen hopefuls.   At that stage, each of the five other players were chasing a massive chip leader in the form of home-grown Czech player Jakub Koleckar, who had roughly three times anyone else’s stack, but things were about to change. Tsonev’s own exit in sixth for €8,498 came after his [poker card="As"][poker card="Kd"] lost to the eventual winner Emil Bise’s [poker card="Qh"][poker card="Jh"], a straight cutting the field to five and boosting Bise’s stack to that of second in chips.   An immediate elimination by Koleckar kept up the pacesetter’s speed, Italian Giuliano Bendinelli crashing out for €11,278, before the Event #2 winner Helmut Phung was taken out in fourth by the chip leader too, Phung’s [poker card="Kd"][poker card="Qd"] unable to overcome Koleckar’s [poker card="Kh"][poker card="Kc"] for a score of €15,351.   Brazilian poker pro and GGPoker ambassador Felipe Ramos is one of the truest examples of a player who is good for the game of poker around the world. His quest to break his bracelet duck, having also come second in recent years too, ended in third place when Koleckar took him out too. Ramos’ [poker card="Qd"][poker card="Jd"] saw him shove on the turn of a board showing [poker card="Kc"][poker card="Jh"][poker card="Td"][poker card="8c"], but he was called by the Czech player who held [poker card="Ac"][poker card="Qs"] and the inconsequential [poker card="8s"] on the river sent Ramos home with €21,416, two places short of the gold.   After the drama of Anson Tsang’s third bracelet win coming in Event #4, both players vying for the title in Event #9 were going for their first-ever WSOP bracelet and it was Bise who got to the promised land. He came from 3:1 down in chips to do it, too, after grabbing the lead back in a hand that didn’t go to showdown.   One hand from victory, Bise pressed his edge of the bigger chip stack impressively and won with [poker card="Ah"][poker card="Th"] against Kolckar’s [poker card="Qd"][poker card="Qs"] with all the chips going into the middle pre-flop. The board of [poker card="Js"][poker card="Jh"][poker card="6c"][poker card="As"][poker card="6d"] broke the partisan rail’s collective heart on the turn as Bise scooped a top pair that would seal the deal one card later for his maiden bracelet in dramatic fashion.   2022 WSOP Europe €2,200 Event #9 Short Deck Final Table Results: Place Winner Country Prize 1st Emil Bise Switzerland €49,521 2nd Jakub Koleckar Czech Republic €30,602 3rd Felipe Ramos Brazil €21,416 4th Helmut Phung Germany €15,351 5th Giuliano Bendinelli Italy €11,278 6th Simeon Tsonev Bulgaria €8,498 7th Tom Orpaz Israel €6,570  
  10. Three more WSOP bracelets have been won in Rozvadov as the World Series of Poker Europe festival’s fourth, fifth and sixth events have produced winners with very different lifetime records in the game.   While two new winners were crowned gold bracelet champions in Events #5 and #6, it was Anson Tang who took down Event #4 and in doing so, claimed his third WSOP bracelet of a superb professional career in the game.   Anson Tsang Wins Event #4 for €95,461   There were 57 players of the 221 entries who reached the final day of action, with just nine of them reaching the final table. The last day of action in the €2,000-entry Pot Limit Omaha Event #4 would take a mammoth 14 hours to conclude as players such as WSOP Main Event final table player Jorryt van Hoof, Colombian tournament regular Farid Jattin and 888poker ambassador Vivian Saliba.   The early levels saw little big movement but once the eliminations began, they came thick and fast. Jorryt van Hoof was unable to repeat his performance at the final table of the WSOP Main Event of 2014, finishing six places short of his third place on that final day eight years ago, this time busting in ninth for €7,168. Van Hoof wasn’t the only one to take an early ‘L’, as Belarussian player Pave Izotov (8th for €8,893) fell to Jattin before he too busted next, crashing out in seventh place for €11,368. Jattin fell to the eventual winner as Tsang’s rivered two pair was good enough to seal an important pot for the chip leader.   Brazilian 888poker pro Vivian Saliba was the next to go as the in-form player’s luck ran out in sixth place for €14,959. Tsang was once again the conqueror, winning with a set of queens to further embolden his claim to the crown. After Austrian Oswin Ziegelbecker (5th for €20,245) and Italian Dario Alioto (4th for €28,162) left the event, three-handed play got under way and would prove the key period of the final table.   After four events of this year’s WSOPE, we don’t yet have an American winner and the closest ‘Old Glory’ has come to victory was when Shawn Stroke busted in third place for €40,232. Stroke was beaten by Tomasz Gluszko, who made a straight on the river to reduce play to a mano-a-mano duel for the gold. Gluszko began facing a deficit, but he managed to overcome that to lead. Anson Tsang is made of strong stuff, however, and he battled back into the lead.   After what had been an epic heads-up, Tsang took the advantage and put it to good use, dominating Gluszko pre-flop with ace-king Tsang’s highest two cards to Gluszko’s ace-jack. A king on the turn put Tsang into a commanding lead and that won him the top prize of €95,461, with Gluszko collecting the runner-up prize of €58,988.   WSOPE 2022 Event #4 €2,000 PLO Final Table Results: Place Player Country Prize 1st Anson Tsang Hong Kong €95,461 2nd Tomasz Gluszko Poland €58,988 3rd Shawn Stroke U.S.A. €40,232 4th Dario Alioto Italy €28,162 5th Oswin Ziegelbecker Austria €20,245 6th Vivian Saliba Brazil €14,959 7th Farid Jattin Colombia €11,368 8th Pavel Izotov Belarus €8,893 9th Jorryt van Hoof Netherlands €7,168   Slovakian Lubos Laska Wins First Bracelet in Style   A dramatic conclusion to the fifth WSOPE event of the series saw Slovakian Lubos Laska take the gold bracelet in his first-ever ranking tournament victory. With 2,982 total entries, the eponymous Laska took the win after a dramatic final table concluded the action in his favor. Only nine made the final cut, with American Jason Wheeler the latest Stateside player to be eliminated short of glory, his [poker card="Kd"][poker card="Jc"] unable to overtake Nino Pansier Junior’s [poker card="Ks"][poker card="Kh"]. Wheeler took home €16,975 for his efforts – as well as a seat into the €10,350-entry Main Event - but missed the really big money.   As eight players battled on, the €550 buy-in event saw Turkish player Ismet Oral cash for €21,590. Oral moved all-in with [poker card="Ad"][poker card="8c"] over Demetrio Camanita’s raise with [poker card="Kh"][poker card="Qs"]. Camanita made the call, however, and the board of [poker card="Qh"][poker card="Qd"][poker card="3d"][poker card="5s"][poker card="4s"] saw Oral drawing dead to the river.   Hungarian player Andras Balogh was the next to bust, crashing out in seventh place for €27,647 when his shove from the cutoff with [poker card="Ad"][poker card="9d"] was met with a call in the form of a shove from Camanita again in the big blind with [poker card="Ac"][poker card="Jc"]. The board was a cruel one, as the flop of [poker card="Kd"][poker card="9s"][poker card="3s"] that put Balogh ahead was followed by a meaningless [poker card="Ts"] but a devastating [poker card="Jh"] on the river.   Czech player Patrik Zidek busted in sixth place for €35,644 when his [poker card="Ks"][poker card="8s"] couldn’t catch Pansier Junior’s [poker card="Ad"][poker card="9c"], then Romanian player Florin Bilan lost out in fifth for €46,262 when his all-in with [poker card="Jc"][poker card="Ts"] was shot down by Lubos Laska’s [poker card="Ad"][poker card="Qc"], a ten on the flop followed by a queen on the river to reduce the field to four.   Laska was starting his ascent to the throne, and he took care of Camanita next. The Italian moved all-in with [poker card="Ad"][poker card="9d"] and ran into Laska’s [poker card="Jd"][poker card="Jc"] which sailed home to send the entertaining Camanita home with €60,442.   South Korean De Han Kim had laddered all the way to third place but could go no further. He moved all-in with [poker card="As"][poker card="5d"] and was called by Laska with [poker card="Kh"][poker card="9s"]. Laska required a bit of luck for this elimination but got it immediately on the [poker card="Ks"][poker card="Qc"][poker card="6d"][poker card="4s"][poker card="5c"] board, heading into heads-up with a lead of 48.8 million to 28.5 million.   Pansier Junior had a lot of catching up to do, but amazingly did so quickly, grabbing the chip lead. Laska, who had never won a ranking tournament before, was undeterred, however, and played fearless poker to wrestle back the initiative. On a flop of [poker card="Qc"][poker card="Ts"][poker card="9c"], Pansier check-raised all-in with [poker card="Td"][poker card="8s"] and was called by Laska with [poker card="Qd"][poker card="7h"]. The turn of a [poker card="Kd"] and the river of a [poker card="3s"] ended the event and led to wild celebrations on the Slovakian’s rail.   WSOPE 2022 Event #5 €550 Colossus Final Table Results: Place Player Country Prize 1st Lubos Laska Slovakia €170,568 2nd Nino Pansier Junior Netherlands €105,241 3rd De Han Kim South Korea €79,495 4th Demetrio Caminita Italy €60,442 5th Florin Bilan Romania €46,262 6th Patrik Zidek Czech Republic €35,644 7th Andras Balogh Hungary €27,647 8th Ismet Oral Turkey €21,590 9th Jason Wheeler U.S.A. €16,975   Roman Conquers Field for Famous Ukrainian Victory   There were 223 entries in Event #6, the €5,000-entry Pot Limit Omaha tournament that would see nine make the unofficial final table. Shaun Deeb was the man who missed that mark by one place, busting in 10th for a very healthy €15,437. When he did so, it was the Israeli player Eran Dov Carmi who held an incredible chip lead. Roman Verenko was, at that point, some way back into the field but came roaring through for victory late in the night.   First to bust at the final table was Dimitrios Michailidis (9th for €18,572), and he was followed by the man who has more cashes in WSOP events than anyone... without winning a bracelet. Roland Israelashvili came close yet again, this time busting in eighth place for €23,042. He was followed by Michael Magalashvili, who hails from Israel, his seventh-placed result worth a terrific €29,453.   Down to the final six, Verenko was rising and so too was Carmi, who took out Oleksii Kovalchuk in sixth for €38,756. Kovalchuk’s queens in the hole were no match for Carmi’s eventual two-pair and both flop and turn improved his hand, and Carmi was running over the table, taking out Thomer Pidun in fifth for €52,453. Pidun had pocket kings in his four cards pre-flop, but Carmi had aces and rocketed into an impressive lead.   Four-handed play saw Carmi suffer the reverse of that situation immediately, as Verenko’s aces got the better of his kings, and that pot was vital, evening up the scores on over 7 million chips for both men rather than giving Carmi a massive chip lead with 14 million of the 22 million chips in play.   Verenko took out American Gergo Nagy in fourth for €72,962 before Carmi slid out of contention himself, all-in with a wrap on a flop of [poker card="Js"][poker card="Ts"][poker card="4d"] with Verenko’s pair of tens on the flop good enough to hold through turn and river to give him a 4:1 chip lead heading into the final battle for the bracelet.   When Swedish player Omar Huang shoved with [poker card="Kd"][poker card="8c"][poker card="7d"][poker card="4h"] heads-up, Verenko called with [poker card="Jd"][poker card="5h"][poker card="3d"][poker card="2s"] and hit gin on the flop, the dealer displaying [poker card="Ad"][poker card="5s"][poker card="4c"] for a flopped wheel straight. Huang asked for a six several times, but it never came, the [poker card="As"] turn and [poker card="Kc"] river completing the board and creating another first-time champion.   WSOPE 2022 Event #6 €5,000 PLO Table Results: Place Player Country Prize 1st Roman Verenko Ukraine €247,288 2nd Omar Huang Sweden €152,827 3rd Eran Dov Carmi Israel €104,234 4th Gergo Nagy U.S.A. €72,962 5th Thomer Pidun Germany €52,453 6th Oleksii Kovalchuk Ukraine €38,756 7th Michael Magalashvili Israel €29,453 8th Roland Israelashvili U.S.A. €23,042 9th Dimitrios Michailidis Greece €18,572  
  11. The World Series of Poker has arrived in Rozvadov, the small town on the border between Czech Republic and Germany. With the world’s biggest travelling poker circus comes the prospect of 15 WSOP bracelet events – but who will win them?   The first three events are in the bag and despite the presence of some big names, three first-time bracelet winners celebrated becoming the envy of the poker world.   Fabio Peluso Wins NLHE Opener for €95,670   The first event of the 2022 World Series of Poker Europe festival cost €350 to play and attracted an incredible 2,454 entries. With a prizepool well in excess of €730,000, two Italians ended up battling for the bracelet as it took three days to find a winner. Peluso, who hails from the tiny Italian town of San Nicandro Garganico, has already had a very profitable year, coming second in Monte Carlo in the FPS Main Event of April, where he won a career-high score of $228,545.   This time out, he landed his first bracelet in his third career WSOP cash. The final table of nine players began with four Italian players making up almost half the remaining field, but after Brazilian player Gabriel Baleeiro left in ninth place for €8,809, that number was reduced as the popular poker player Simone Andrian left in eighth place for €11,254, his [poker card="6h"][poker card="6d"] dominated and destroyed by chip leader Dennis Wilke’s [poker card="As"][poker card="Ad"].   It was the only Czech player to make the first final table of the series who busted next, as Miroslav Navratil departed in seventh place for €14,509. His all-in with [poker card="Td"][poker card="Tc"] was called by Carlo Savinelli with [poker card="Ad"][poker card="Qd"] and the board of [poker card="9c"][poker card="8h"][poker card="7d"][poker card="8d"][poker card="3d"] was favorable to the Italian in cruel fashion, handing Savinelli a runner-runner flush and skittling the home crowd’s pick.   Italy vs. Germany in Final Six Drama   Exactly half the remaining six players were Italian, with the other half all German. Gennaro Proscia reduced Italian hopes when he crashed out in sixth place, his [poker card="As"][poker card="Ac"] taken out in dramatic fashion by the eventual winner Fabio Peluso. He called Proscia’s four-bet shove holding [poker card="Ah"][poker card="Kh"] and while he remained behind after the [poker card="Kc"][poker card="7h"][poker card="4c"] flop, the [poker card="3h"] turn was followed by the [poker card="Kd"] on the river, giving Peluso trips to send Proscia home with €18,875.   A trio of German eliminations followed as Dennis Wilke went in fifth from hero to zero, his [poker card="Qh"][poker card="Jh"] shot down by Savinelli’s [poker card="Ac"][poker card="Th"] for €24,773. Next out was Kevin Fluegel, who cashed for €32,801 in fourth place, his [poker card="Ad"][poker card="Kh"] outrun by Peluso’s [poker card="Qc"][poker card="Jd"] when the board came [poker card="Qh"][poker card="Jc"][poker card="4d"][poker card="Jh"][poker card="Ac"] to give the Italian chip leader an unassailable full house by the turn.   Stefan Vogt went out in third place for €43,813 after his [poker card="Qh"][poker card="Th"] was unable to overtake Savinelli’s [poker card="Ad"][poker card="9h"]. The [poker card="Ac"][poker card="Jc"][poker card="8d"] flop was followed by an [poker card="8c"] turn and [poker card="Jh"] river. That left Savinelli with 31.6 million and Peluso with just 17.5 million chips, but those roles were about to become reversed.   It took just 30 minutes of play for that role reversal to take place as Peluso took charge of the final duel, his recent form proving more valuable than the years of experience Savinelli had on his side. Eventually, Savinelli’s [poker card="Ac"][poker card="7c"] couldn’t hit against the [poker card="5d"][poker card="5c"] of Peluso to leave the latter celebrating a famous win as the first WSOP bracelet winner of the 2022 festival, claiming a top prize of €95,670. Savinelli had to be satisfied with €59,032.   “I have been playing a lot more live poker in the past year,’ said Peluso afterwards. “I used to play only online and I have now been playing professionally for about two years. I have been studying a lot and discussing spots with my poker friends.”   Peluso not only took home the gold and the biggest prize on offer, but he’s the first of 15 bracelet winners this WSOPE series to win entry into the $1 million free-entry 2023 Tournament of Champions which will take place following the 2023 WSOP Main Event in Las Vegas.   WSOP Europe Event #1 €350 NLHE Opener Final Table Results: Place Player Country Prize 1st Fabio Peluso Italy €95,670 2nd Carlo Savinelli Italy €59,032 3rd Stefan Vogt Germany €43,813 4th Kevin Fluegel Germany €32,801 5th Dennis Wilke Germany €24,773 6th Gennaro Proscia Italy €18,875 7th Miroslav Navratil Czech Republic €14,509 8th Simone Andrian Italy €11,254 9th Gabriel Baleeiro Brazil €8,809 Phung Claims German Title after Almaas Goes Close   The second event of the series, the €550-entry Pot Limit Omaha Event #2, was won by German player Helmut Phung as he outlasted a field of 566 entries. The nine-handed final table saw local anti-hero Martin Kabrhel bust out first as the controversial trash-talker barely got his opening lines out before his exit in ninth for €4,057.   Next to go was Bosnian player Misel Bosancic for €5,210, before Polish pro Bartlomiej Staszczak left the event in seventh place for a score worth €6,815. Andreas Zampas lost his stack to Jakob Madsen in sixth place for €9,078 as the latter flopped the nut straight to skittle the Greek player. With five players left, no-one had less than 17 big blinds or more than 47 with Phung the leader.   After French player Greg Sellam left in fifth place for €12,310, Madsen found it was his turn to run out of luck, as his opponent Martin Almaas called a ten out of the air on the turn to knock him out for €16,987. Down to three, it would be Pascal Foged who missed out on taking on his compatriot heads-up, instead busting to Phung, as his [poker card="As"][poker card="Kd"][poker card="Qc"][poker card="5s"] lost to Phung’s [poker card="9h"][poker card="5c"][poker card="4h"][poker card="3c"] with the chips committed pre-flop. “I hope I can win one time because I get very bad cards at the final table all the time,” Foged said shortly before fulfilling his own prophecy to bust.   That left Phung with 11 million chips, a stack that dwarfed Almaas’ own pile of 3.3 million. Heads-up was a brief and brutal affair, Phung’s flopped flush trumping Almaas’ own flush at the last. That gave Almaas the consolation prize of €34,051, with Phung claiming the top prize of €55,132 and the WSOP gold bracelet which he won for the first time in his career.   WSOP Europe Event #2 €550 Pot Limit Omaha Final Table Results: Place Player Country Prize 1st Helmut Phung Germany €55,132 2nd Martin Almaas Norway €34,051 3rd Pascal Foged Germany €23,848 4th Jakob Madsen Denmark €16,987 5th Gregory Sellam France €12,310 6th Andreas Zampas Greece €9,078 7th Bartlomiej Staszczak Poland €6,815 8th Misel Bosancic Bosnia & Herzegovina €5,210 9th Martin Kabrhel Czech Republic €4,057 Savevski Slays Schoss Heads-Up for Maiden Gold   The third event of the 2022 WSOPE saw Macedonian Ilija Savevski claim the €245,319 top prize in the €1,350 buy-in Mini Main Event, which mirrors the €10,350-entry Event #12 which kicks off on the 10th of this month. The final table was an entertaining affair, with nine players battling it out for over €750,000 that remained at that point.   French player Clement Cure was the first to go, his prize of €21,162 also coming with a 2022 WSOP Europe Main Event ticket like all the final table players would receive. Cure found his [poker card="3s"][poker card="3h"] no match for Peter Kamaras’ [poker card="As"][poker card="Ah"], with the board of [poker card="Qc"][poker card="9h"][poker card="4s"][poker card="8h"][poker card="Jd"] no help to the Frenchmen.   Only one Italian player made this final table and Emanuele de Lemmi crashed out early in eighth place, busting for €27,109 when his [poker card="Kd"][poker card="Jd"] couldn’t triumph against Stefan Schoss’ [poker card="Qc"][poker card="Tc"], a board of [poker card="Qd"][poker card="Th"][poker card="3d"][poker card="2h"][poker card="8h"] seeing all the money go in on the turn and miss De Lemmi’s straight and flush draws on the river.   Out in seventh place was the Portuguese player Braz Fagundes Junior, whose result of €35,124 was bettered by the first South Korean final table player in sixth place, as Yunho Choi cashed for €46,027. Choi’s [poker card="Kc"][poker card="3c"] was drawing live against Savevski’s [poker card="Ad"][poker card="Th"], but the board of [poker card="Ts"][poker card="6d"][poker card="2h"][poker card="8s"][poker card="4s"] took it away from the South Korean in dispiriting fashion.   Of the final five players, three players hailed from Germany, but one of them was to bust next. Jochen Kaiser was that man as he busted in fifth for €60,990. Kaiser’s [poker card="Kd"][poker card="9h"] was drawing dead to the river against Savevski’s [poker card="Qd"][poker card="Tc"] on a board of [poker card="Qs"][poker card="Th"][poker card="3c"][poker card="Ts"] and the [poker card="6d"] river meant nothing as another combatant was swept away.   Kamaras was the next player to be eliminated, missing out on the podium places when his chances ended in the same hand as the third-place finisher Dennis Magro. Kamaras had [poker card="Ad"][poker card="4c"], while Magro held [poker card="Tc"][poker card="Td"], but both of the lost their stacks to Savevski’s [poker card="Kd"][poker card="Qd"] when the board of [poker card="Jh"][poker card="6d"][poker card="4s"][poker card="8c"][poker card="Ks"] broke two hearts on the river.   That gave Savevski a crucial lead, as his 78.8 million chips faced off against Schoss with 64 million. The final hand came about soon after, with Savevski’s [poker card="Kc"][poker card="4c"] ahead of Schoss’ [poker card="Kd"][poker card="5c"] on the flop of [poker card="Ks"][poker card="8h"][poker card="4s"] when the chips went in. A turn of [poker card="7c"] and river of [poker card="3s"] later and the Macedonian Savevski was a first-time bracelet winner for €245,319, Schoss taking the runner-up prize of €151,554.   WSOP Europe Event #3 €1,350 Mini Main Event Final Table Results: Place Player Country Prize 1st Ilija Savevski Macedonia €245,319 2nd Stefan Schoss Germany €151,554 3rd Dennis Magro Germany €110,686 4th Peter Kamaras Hungary €81,716 5th Jochen Kaiser Germany €60,990 6th Yunho Choi South Korea €46,027 7th Braz Fagundes Junior Portugal €35,124 8th Emanuele de Lemmi Italy €27,109 9th Clement Cure France €21,162
  12. filosophurKK - Poker Captain: Navigate The Tournament

     

  13. filosophurKK - Get Ready To Play Poker | Focus & Crush (EDM Burst)

     

     

     

     

     

  14.  

    filosophurKK - Winning The Tournament (Trance Burst)

  15. Businesses of all shapes and sizes walk a fine line every day. They need to ensure that they allocate capital and resources to getting the job done to the highest standard. Yet at the same time, they face a constant battle to mitigate overhead costs. A great business needs a great team, but even the best team has blind spots in their knowledge, gaps in their experience and lacking skills that not even the most enthusiastic autodidact can teach themselves. 

    Perhaps it’s for this reason why so many  businesses prefer hiring freelancers . Let’s take a look at some of the reasons why companies prefer to post freelance jobs online rather than expanding their team.

  16.  

     

     

     

     

    filosophurKK - Tetris Trance (Original Mix)

     

     

     

     

     

      

      

     

     

     

     

  17.  

     

    Playing the drum part to Killswitch Engage - "In Due Time" (Intro, 1st verse/chorus)

  18. Poker players are notorious for nothing if not the ability to be different. Everyone comes to the game from a different walk of life, background or social class. In many ways, this leveller is what makes the game what it is. You could be sitting with anyone from anywhere and that is unlike any other game of its size in the world.   One of the many quirks of poker is the art of tipping. Around the world, social conventions dictate very different acceptable practices to how, when and where to tip. At the poker table, that worldwide variance often causes confusion or in some cases, conflict. This week, Poker Twitter blew up over the subject. But what is the best line to take?   How the Row Erupted   Lex ‘O’ Poker is not only a hugely popular poker YouTuber with over 47,000 subscribers, but an extremely active social media profile, so when he talks, people will listen and likely agree or disagree in their numbers. This week, he tweeted about tipping, following up his initial comment with the following explanation:   “I tip more or less according to speed, table control, friendship, attitude, etc,” he said. “The fast, efficient dealers with a great attitude get tipped way more. The size of the pot shouldn’t matter if you play poker for a living. I may tip smaller per hand, but I tip much, much more $ annually compared to the random rec. I may play 1,200+ hours a year, that’s a lot of $1 tips compared to the rec playing 300 hours a year. However, if poker is not your source of income than it doesn’t matter how much you tip. Everyone with a differing opinion on this doesn’t play poker for a living. Therefore, the statement doesn’t apply to you. If you play poker for a living its a business. U must treat it like one. Base tip allows you to thank the dealer for their service while also keeping a winrate. The purpose behind starting this thread is that I get tip shamed on my YouTube videos for throwing $5-$10 in a big pot. So I stated what my thoughts are on the topic.”   While there are obviously parts of Lex’s statement that could do with looking at in more detail, the biggest plus is that the comment got the industry talking at all about an issue that has raised its head a few times.   Bart Hanson’s almost immediate reply was to say, “I hope you don’t use this approach in live-streamed games.” To which Lex replied: “Last time I played Hustler Casino Live, I tipped $5+ [for] every pot I won. Mostly because I believe those dealers are some of the best in the country. My tweet was regarding regular public (non-streamed) games.”   That clarified Lex’s stance, but was he wrong or right? Are more tips better? Or does the amount per tip matter more than the frequency with which they are given? And when and how should you tip if you’re a poker player – and of what level? There were more questions than answers.   A Returning Industry   Poker dealers are, it is almost universally agreed, an underappreciated workforce. The first to lose their jobs in 2020, they are still criticized daily despite never being to blame for the cards they deal. When COVID-19 struck, many poker dealers were left with no option but to leave their jobs, and retrain in a different industry, affecting many people’s families.   Recent times have seen poker dealers lured back to poker, in no small part thanks to a recruitment drive at the start of the last World Series of Poker that saw dealers paid a minimum of $12.50 an hour with a $100 bonus after successfully completing their first shift. Dealers were then paid $15 per down for sitting at all tournament Hold’em bracelet event and side event tables, with $20 per down for all non-Hold’em bracelet events.   https://twitter.com/CaesarsEnt/status/1506040896130793472   Was this enough, and were dealers happy with these terms, and is the problem what casino operators or poker rooms are paying them as a basic wage? Two comments hint at the diversity of opinion on the subject, with one player commenting: “I thoroughly disagree with this. Dealers are the backbone of the industry. We would have no job without them. I tip a % based on pot with a +/- differential depending on speed, accuracy etc. And I believe that is correct, as a professional.”   In response, another countered: “Then they should have their unions try to get a solid hourly rate that’s not based on tips. Just remove the tipping and charge a higher rake. That way it properly charges the players who are dragging in more pots.”   So is being a dealer a performance-based job and if it is, should it be, or would this discourage new dealers from taking up a position?   Does Tipping Negatively Affect a Dealer’s Basic Wage?   One player never afraid to court controversy on social media is Charlie Carrel, whose comment on whether a refusal to tip dealers might positively influence decision-makers to change basic salaries in a positive sense.   https://twitter.com/Charlie_Carrel/status/1585195755903782912   As you might expect, the blowback from Carrel’s question almost immediately warranted it being asked. One follower asked the British poker legend: “Do you tip dealers at cash tables in the UK?”, to which Careel replied: “No, only in private games.”   Another said that his suggestion was ‘an interesting idea’ but that “Casinos would likely just stop offering poker if they had to take any kind of financial hit or couldn’t find dealers to work.”   This was a common response and the threat of this would likely dissuade a lot of dealers from working. One player said: “Ultimately I think if that happened they would rake you more to cover higher wages so essentially it would balance out the same, the difference is in the current system the winners are mostly paying the extra which is also better for the recs/losing players.”   Carrel, however, disagreed, saying, “If they rake higher, then people go elsewhere, or stop playing. I don't think that would necessarily happen.”   With many responses hinting at the disparity in tipping cultures between the United States and Europe, then Australasia and the U.S., the only clear fact is a simple one. Dealers are not yet currently recompensed for the immense service they provide the poker industry, solving the problem is a lot more difficult than identifying it. Image credit: World Poker Tour / Tomáš Stacha.
  19. Some poker players come and go, and others stick around. But the legends? They exist forever in the retold stories that will still be spun fifty years from now. If you’ve never heard of Clint Keown, or ‘Basketball Clint’, then the bad news is that you’ve missed out on one of the funniest poker stories you’ll ever have heard.   The good news is that you get to read all about it today.   Len Ashby has been a cash game player in some of the biggest games on the planet for two decades. He cut his teeth in Los Angeles, Las Vegas, California and other East Coast locations. He still lives and plays in Nevada today and is a regular in cardrooms such as ARIA, the Bellagio or wherever the World Series of Poker lands as well as private games. Len grew up loving sports but he was never as good at any sport the way one of his fellow poker players was – Clint Keown.   Meeting ‘Basketball Clint’   Len met Clint a couple of years after ‘The Moneymaker Effect’ had kicked poker and gambling into the sky.   “I graduated from college in 2004 and was playing a lot of poker. I was going to a lot of casinos in Indiana. Clint was from Evansville, Indiana. He went to school there for a year and was the standout basketball player. He was runner-up in Mr. Basketball, which is basically to say who the best basketball player in the state of Indiana is.”   This is saying something. Indiana is one of the strongest states for basketball states in the United States when it comes to high school basketball. They have a lot of talent, and Clint was at the top of it.   “I believe he quit school after a year to play poker for a living,” Len continues. “He played some minor league baseball too. Don Mattingly grew up in Evansville, Scott Rolen was a baseball player that played for the Phillies. Clint was better than all of them, they all said that. It’s crazy that he found his way into poker, really.”   Once at the table, Clint was a good player, but Len always considered his presence at the poker felt a travesty against the skill he had on the basketball court. Somehow, the pair always seemed to meet on the road and he got to watch Clint in action for the first time in 2009.   “Gambling and poker was so much fun back then. Clint was there during the World Series. It was late, 2am. We were playing every day. Clint had just beat this kid out of all of his money - a prominent online player. This kid was talking about basketball and how he’d shoot anyone.”   That’s basketball lingo for throwing the ball into the net better than any challenger. Enter Clint.   “I’d yet to see Clint shoot. Clint beat him out of $30,000. Fast forward a couple weeks after and there was talk around the poker room about Clint’s gambling and that he would shoot anybody for money at basketball.”   [caption id="attachment_640107" align="aligncenter" width="908"] Clint Keown was a popular player at the felt, but put a basketball in his hand and he was a wizard... as Big Rick and Kelly were about to find out.[/caption]   Making the Bet   Late one night, Len was playing in a ‘must move’ $50/$100 PLO game. Biding his time in an attempt to get in the main game (“It was a game with Devilfish in, but no-one was ever going to quit.”), two guys at the table got to talking with Len.   “Big Rick was a really nice guy, a recreational player but he could hold his own. Then there was a guy named Kelly who was from Tennessee. He was bald and always had a stogie in his mouth. Kelly could not win a hand the whole World Series. He was losing most days and we were playing short-handed. He looks at me and goes ‘You still got that buddy who likes to shoot basketball? I said ‘Yeah, Clint?’ He said, ‘I think I might have a bet for him’. I immediately grabbed my phone and text Clint ‘Are you awake? I told him to come down to the poker game and he might get some action.”   Setting aside the fact that at 2am in 2009 Vegas, there’s a good chance of a prop bet being ‘on call’, I can’t wait to hear how this comes together. Len tells me that he just let Kelly and Rick talk.   “I didn’t want it to come off as [a set-up]. I just said Clint likes to shoot and he’s good and likes to gamble. Kelly said he’d bet he can’t make 96 out of 100 free throws getting his own rebounds.”   I have to ask about that, because it seems important. Turns out that it is. Essentially, Clint would have to shoot from the free throw line and every time he shot one, he’d have to go and fetch the ball and walk back to the free throw line. The reason Kelly took this angle – quite understandably – was that if you’re stood still on the free throw line, you can keep your feet set. If you get your rebounds, you’re never going to be in that same spot. Mentally, it’s a challenge. You’re seeing a slightly different picture.   “I asked Clint if free throws are OK, and he said ‘yes’. So in comes Clint, he walks up and looks completely like someone who would not be athletic or be able to play basketball. He’s not tall; he’s 5’11, maybe six foot. He’s got curly hair, he might have had braces at the time. He just doesn’t come off like an all-star basketball player.”   Clint spoke with Kelly and Big Rick. Kelly proposed the bet – that Clint couldn’t shoot 96 out of 100 free throws.   “Clint is the worst hustler of all time,” laughs Len. “I mean that literally. Clint’s response was ‘Whoah, wow, 96? I’m more of a three-point shooter.’ He’s not lying when he says that. He says ‘I like to shoot threes but I don’t know if I could do those free throws. Kelly’s whispering with Rick back and forth, he looks up and says, ‘All right I got two bets for you.’   The bets were very specific in their numbers. 95 out of 100 free throws would be a tie, 96 out of 100 would win the first bet for Clint. On the three pointers, Kelly and Big Rick agreed that Clint would need 57 out of 100 to win the bet. Each bet’s value? $20,000.   “I literally had to bite my lip to stop laughing. I mean, Clint could make 57 out of 100 three-pointers blindfold. I’m being serious – I’d back him to do that. I looked at Kelly and Rick and said, ‘You all wanna go right now?’ I went to get everyone racks. It was me, Kelly, Big Rick, and two friend of mine and Clints, Matt and Rich.”   The 24-Hour Fitness Center   The six-strong gang head to a place called 24 Hour Fitness, after Le rode there with Kelly and Rick. While in the back seat of their car, he gets a text from Clint that reads simply: ’57, ha ha ha’.   “I said ‘What about the free throws?’ He replied, ‘Free throws aren’t 100%, but should be OK.’ He said I could have a $5k freeroll. I didn’t care, I was there for the thrill of it, but I was like OK, cool. Kelly and Rick were good guys, They didn’t know I had a piece, but Kelly was wanting to gamble on something and thought he had a decent bet. He obviously didn’t, he was drawing dead.”   The posse arrive at the fitness center and surprise a relatively startled receptionist.   “We walked in and the girl working the front desk probably thought we were there to rob the place. Kelly’s 6’5”, he’s got this long, weathered trenchcoat on and a cigar in his mouth at 2am. We looked like a bunch of gangsters. I asked the girl for the gym for an hour, threw her $50 for it and we were good.”   Once they arrived at the court itself, a teenage boy was shooting hoops. ‘Maybe his Mom was at the fitness center’, Len supposed. To this day, Len has no idea how he ended up there, but it ended up being fairly important.   “Clint asked him if he could borrow his ball. The kid agreed and Clint bounced it, ran it up and down, and asked him how much he paid for it. “I dunno, $30.” The kid said. Clint said, ‘I’ll give you a hundred for it right now’. Clint pulled out a hundred-dollar bill and gave it to him. He wanted a good ball to shoot with. The house balls were real slick, with no grip; he wanted a good ball.”   According to Len, the kid just took off, never sticking around to watch the show, something which I can’t help wondering about. Somewhere out there, this boy is now a man and just has a funny story about how a guy once paid him $100 for a $30 ball. Back to the court, though. Kelly and Rick let Clint warm up. Len, Rich and Matt are sitting on the floor at the right side of the court, Kelly and Rick are on the other side, Clint is in the middle, limbering up.   “It takes a while to shoot 100 free throws,’ says Len. ‘He’s in the 80s and has missed two. He missed one late, I think he made 97. Now I know we know we’re winning the money, ‘cause the other one is a lock. I remember thinking if I’m Clint here, I’m gonna make 60/100 threes. I’m never going to make 80 or 90, because keep it small and they might run it back and bet it again. You just wanna sneak over the line.”   This thought process, however logical it might be to Len, completely escapes the star of the show. Because make no bones about it – this is a show, and the performer is now exactly where he wants to be – in the spotlight.   “This is what I mean about him being the worse hustler. He just can’t help himself. He starts the three-point bet and makes his first 15. I’m thinking that Kelly is going to kill me. I’ll never forget it. Clint went and got his rebound after his 15th shot, he takes the ball, spins it out in front of him towards the wing where there’s an angle and it’s not a straight on shot. He catches it, turns, then banks it in of the back board. He takes it, spins it up in the air again over to the other wing and does the same thing. Matt is dying laughing - he can’t keep it in.”   Paying the Money   With the atmosphere very different on the left-hand side of the court, Len hears the clack clack of Kelly’s cowboy boots across the basketball court.   “He’s walking across the court and I’m thinking he’s going to kill me, I’m nervous. He reaches into his jacket. He pulls out $40,000 in cash and he just wings it across the court towards us. It's sliding through the dust on the floor. He just looks at us and says, ‘I don’t need to see any more.’ He didn’t even have to finish the bet because they know it’s over.   As the dollar bills flick up through the air, landing in Len and the others’ laps, Clint is laughing his head off. Big Rick and Kelly are gone. But Len can’t believe what Clint’s done.   “I’m like, ‘Dude, why did you do that?’ Maybe they’d want to bet again. We won $40,000. I won $5,000, Matt got a little piece of it too. But...’   Len still sees Rick at the tables, and they talk about the bet, tell the story to anyone new around the felt who might not have heard it. According to Len, Clint no longer hustles for bets. He lives in Florida, has a child, and grew up. But to this day, if you walk into a Vegas or Los Angeles or likely Florida cash game and get on the intercom to ask if anyone knows ‘Basketball Clint’, you’ll get plenty of takers.   But there’s one more thing. The morning after that night, Len got a call. He let it go, slept right through it most likely. But the voicemail light was on when he woke. It was Big Rick.   “He said ‘I just have one favor to ask you. I want you to ask Clint for the ball. I wanna hang that ball in my office to remind me of how f**king dumb I am.’”   Len is happy to do that one favor for Big Rick and calls up Clint. The reply is what makes Clint Keown one of the most unique people on this poker-playing planet.   “He said ‘Man, I paid $100 for that ball, I’m not giving it away.’”      
  20. On the road to 100k in cashes...

  21. Having some fun making EDM on the iMac.

  22. I will start posting my sessions here for feedback. I will also add you to my PokerBankroll Tracker if interested. 

     

    As of October 6, 2002, in my last 28 live events, since Aug 2022, I have had 9 wins and 12 final tables.  My biggest score is $6500 in the $350 KO at Hollywood Casino. I have three wins and one championship ring from the Cash Cow Poker TV Series and will continue to play that throughout the year. My documented tournament ROI is $157%. 

     

    I am moving up to play more events at Rungood.com and WSOPC events throughout the midwest. Having four kids makes doing that challenging but they are the reason I work so hard. I am looking for a little help to move up in the ranks to continue my growth in the game. I do have a few live wins that I am on the featured table the entire tournament if you really want to take a deep dive into my game. 

     

    I am happy to chat with anyone interested and have references as to my professional approach and my financial stability and reliability. 

     

     

  23. ♠️♦️♣️♥️

  24. Azarado no jogo e no amor. 

  25. Azarado no jogo e no amor.

  26. I've been out of the online arena for a while and I now have some time to kill so I've decided to get back into forum posting and trying to study a little more and get back into studying tournament play so I can play the main event in Vegas and actually feel comfortable for once. I hope everyone on here is still as committed to the enjoyment of the game as we used to be and hopefully it can be a positive experience again.

  27. The Aspiring Poker Pro is a small stakes poker MTT vlogger sharing his journey  to become a Poker Pro. You will find a wide array of poker highlights, poker study sessions, hand reviews and much more.  Check out the Aspiring Poker Pro's channel here... 

    Subscribe to my YouTube channel here...  

    Watch me stream live at https://www.twitch.tv/aspiringpokerpro
    #coinpoker #pokerhighlight #AspiringPokerPro #Poker #TwitchPoker #OnlinePoker #PokerTournament  #PokerHighlights #pokerhightlight
    Sign up for Americas Cardroom and get up to a $2000 Bonus... click this link https://record.secure.acraffiliates.com/_qSNVhgceXvI08F9bOqxqEmNd7ZgqdRLk/1/

    Follow Me!
    http://www.aspiringpokerpro.com
    http://twitter.com/DennisSteele
    http://www.facebook.com/aspiringpokerpro
    http://www.instagram.com/aspiringpokerpro

  28. The Aspiring Poker Pro is a small stakes poker MTT vlogger sharing his journey  to become a Poker Pro. You will find a wide array of poker highlights, poker study sessions, hand reviews and much more.  Check out the Aspiring Poker Pro's channel here... 

    Subscribe to my YouTube channel here...  

    Watch me stream live at https://www.twitch.tv/aspiringpokerpro
    #coinpoker #pokerhighlight #AspiringPokerPro #Poker #TwitchPoker #OnlinePoker #PokerTournament  #PokerHighlights #pokerhightlight
    Sign up for Americas Cardroom and get up to a $2000 Bonus... click this link https://record.secure.acraffiliates.com/_qSNVhgceXvI08F9bOqxqEmNd7ZgqdRLk/1/

    Follow Me!
    http://www.aspiringpokerpro.com
    http://twitter.com/DennisSteele
    http://www.facebook.com/aspiringpokerpro
    http://www.instagram.com/aspiringpokerpro

  29. The Aspiring Poker Pro is a small stakes poker MTT vlogger sharing his journey  to become a Poker Pro. You will find a wide array of poker highlights, poker study sessions, hand reviews and much more.  Check out the Aspiring Poker Pro's channel here... 

    Subscribe to my YouTube channel here...  

    Watch me stream live at https://www.twitch.tv/aspiringpokerpro
    #coinpoker #pokerhighlight #AspiringPokerPro #Poker #TwitchPoker #OnlinePoker #PokerTournament  #PokerHighlights #pokerhightlight
    Sign up for Americas Cardroom and get up to a $2000 Bonus... click this link https://record.secure.acraffiliates.com/_qSNVhgceXvI08F9bOqxqEmNd7ZgqdRLk/1/

    Follow Me!
    http://www.aspiringpokerpro.com
    http://twitter.com/DennisSteele
    http://www.facebook.com/aspiringpokerpro
    http://www.instagram.com/aspiringpokerpro

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